Sunday, September 7, 2008

1. This is called a Gibbs Armadillo trap because of how it looks, but it was used for catching live muskrats so they could be transported to another area, patent number 1,765,144. The top and bottom both collapse, making the height just a couple of inches. It's placed in a shallow stream, when it's tripped the animal's leg is caught, after the top expands the leg is released and the trap raises several inches above the water.

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Most of the photos on this page were taken in the North American Trap Collectors Museum.






2. A Verbail Chain Loop coyote trap, this foot snare is shown in the set position:




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3. An Evans mouse/fish trap, patent number 189,805:

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4. A man trap, it was used by a wealthy land owner in England to catch poachers. It takes a key to open the jaws and they can't be pried apart. It was designed so as not to break the leg, a small consolation since the victim probably paid with his life.

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The stick was used as a trigger, it kept the jaws open and when stepped on, the trap was sprung.

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5. The trap below was meant to capture a chicken thief, according to the patent:

This invention relates to jaw traps and, among other objects, aims to provide a jaw trap which may be used to capture chicken thieves, being so constructed that the more the victim struggles the closer together the jaws move. A further object is to provide a jaw trap having a jaw locking mechanism which prevents the jaws from being pried apart by the victim, the mechanism itself being so guarded that the victim cannot release himself. A further object is to provide a jaw trap for the purpose stated which is so constructed that the victim is not injured in any way.

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Patent number 1,840,581:

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6. A Nisbet trap, patent number 588,169, the wicked looking teeth are not really more effective than a trap without them, so these traps were only made for a short period and are somewhat rare, one of them sold for over $2,000 on ebay earlier this year.




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According to this site, leg hold traps aren't as cruel as most people might think:

The leg-hold trap has been around for centuries. In the past 40 years, great improvements have been made in the name of animal comfort. Coil spring traps that close tight were all tested. The results will surprise most hunters. The animals were attached with sensors and their breathing and heart rate was monitored. The facts were; the animals only fought the trap for about 15 minutes. Then the animal started to calm down. At about 1 hour after being in the trap, the heartbeat and breathing returned to near normal levels. So, you see, it is a myth that the animal is sitting there in pain being tortured the whole time. You can't argue with scientific facts.










7. A Little Sampson rat trap:

















8. An Adirondack Instant Death muskrat trap:



From this page:
People have a problem thinking of the muskrat in a good light. Because of the rat name and the rat tail, most people can't think about eating them. Muskrats live anywhere there is water, including ditches, ponds, lakes, rivers, etc. There diet is cattail roots, sweet flag, bulrush, apples, etc. They eat good food and are delicious to eat, but I think they have one of the best furs, silky soft and smooth. In Louisiana they sell the muskrat at the meat store under the name "marsh rabbit," and when you stop and think about it they are correct. The muskrat eats good food from the wild just like a wild rabbit does.















9. A Jillson rat trap, patent 16,335, classified as a spear trap:












10. A snapping turtle trap:

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11. A concussion gun, used on moles:

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12. A gopher trap:

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13. A Taylor gopher trap:


Classified as a claw trap:

















14. A Funsten Submarine floating muskrat trap:

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15. A Nebraska Trail coyote trap, these were covered in snow when used.

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Some coyote lore that I found while researching traps:
There is a rule that the old deer hunters use around here. If you wound a deer at just before dark, track him until you find him. You don't have to do anything but touch the deer. Then the deer is safe from coyotes that night and maybe the next night. Now why do you suppose that is true? Because of trappers. That is correct -- coyotes learn that fresh kill with human scent equals danger. So think about it when you're trapping coyotes. Check your traps from a distance using binoculars to keep your scent down and you will catch more animals.












16. A raccoon trap, the spring would catch the front paw when they tried to get the bait in the cylinder:













17. Snares for catching wild birds:













18. A Sensible rat trap:

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19. An Ideal trap for catching gophers, another claw trap:



















20. A mole trap:
















21. A Gabriel fish trap:

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22. A Taylor Torpedo Smoker, it's threaded into a hole in the ground to smoke out an animal.




















23. This is a live bird trap. Trap shooting got its name from these devices, they held a bird that was released by pulling the lever. The small door was used to put the bird inside.

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24. A lark mirror, the pointed end was stuck in the ground and the cord was pulled to spin the top part; the small mirrors lured the larks down for a closer look to find out what it was, and the birds were then taken with either a net or a gun. These were used mostly in Europe.

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25. A muskrat den spear, or muskrat tamer:

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26. A fish gaff, used to pull a large fish into a boat:

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From the Michigan Whitetail Hall of Fame Museum











27. A clamp for opening a bear trap:


This trap was made for display only:

A few more bear traps and numerous other unidentified traps can be seen here and here.











28. A Newhouse wolf trap combination tool, used as a hammer, wrench, and spring compressor; it's also used for making adjustments to the trap. Another rare piece, if you happen to have one, they are worth over $1000.



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2 comments:

rtfgvb767 said...

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ravi said...

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